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Race begins for Crossrail 2 contracts

Race begins for Crossrail 2 contracts

Network Rail has launched its search for consultants to work on the Crossrail Two project. Contracts worth an estimated £60 million over a five-year period are now open to competition.The successful bidder will be expected to work on the above-ground aspects of the £27 billion development, which is set to connect Surrey and Hertfordshire. They will also need to provide environmental impact studies, land requirement assessments, risk forecasts, topographical surveys and stakeholder consultations. The main focuses will be design and consultancy.While Network Rail is responsible for some aspects of the project, Transport for London (TfL) will take on the Central Operating Section, which will run from Tottenham Hale and New Southgate to Wimbledon, as well being in charge of underground builds.The On-Networks contract is worth £60 million, with the potential for add-ons of between £15 and £30 million at a later stage.Development is set to enter its next phase in April 2016. Prospective contractors who would like to be considered for the work are required to contact Network Rail by September 14th.The line was originally proposed in the 1970s, when it was known as the Chelsea-Hackney route. The plans have now been revised and resurrected in the wake of the High Speed Two project, which includes upgrades to Euston station. Construction is now expected to begin at some point in the 2020s.The first Crossrail project is set to begin running partial services by the end of 2018, with full functionality arriving the following year. Built at a cost of £14.8 billion, it will provide high-frequency trains between east and west London, as well as parts of Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Essex. It is regarded as a particularly challenging project due to the need to dig new tunnels through central London, avoiding existing lines and utility mains.The underground tunnel network required for the route was recently completed, meaning that there is only the fitting out to do before trains can begin operation. 

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