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Birmingham City submits plans for new block

Birmingham City submits plans for new block

Birmingham City University has requested planning permission for a new building in the ongoing development of its Eastside campus.If approved, the building would provide more than 100,000 sq ft of new teaching space, and be built as an extension to the brand-new Curzon Building, which is expected to be finished soon by contractors Dixon Wilmott, in time to welcome new students joining in the autumn. It will be the new home of the faculty of business, law and social sciences, along with the school of English.The extension is currently known only as Plot 2a, and consists of a six and two-storey section. When completed, it is expected to boost the Curzon Building’s capacity of 5,000 students to 8,000. It will be located within metres of the new High Speed Two station that is set to open in 2026.The proposal is part of the university’s wider programme of expansion, which also includes a new conservatoire in the city centre. The faculties of arts, design and media are already housed at the new Parkside Campus.Construction is already underway at the site to create a building to house support staff at 6 Cardigan Street, as well as the No 1 City Locks residential building, which will provide accommodation to 650 students.Speaking to the Birmingham Post, Paul Hartley, pro vice-chancellor of research, enterprise and business engagement, said: "Birmingham City University is playing a huge part in transforming and regenerating the Eastside of Birmingham, through its rapidly expanding city centre campus."This planning application forms a key element of this continuing transformation. The proposed development would give us the high-quality additional teaching and learning space needed to accommodate our expanding student numbers.”He added: “This is a thoroughly exciting time to be part of Birmingham City University." With a budget of £30 million, the university is currently accepting tenders from prospective contractors to realise the design created by Birmingham-based Associated Architects. 

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