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Developer prepares to start work on Bath site

Developer prepares to start work on Bath site

Investment firm Aberdeen Asset Management has revealed work will begin very soon on a project to develop 244 new homes in the heart of Bath.
 
The company acquired the site of the former Bath Press from Meyer Homes last week and said demolition work will start at the five-acre site 'imminently', with construction work set to get underway in early 2018. No contractor has been confirmed as yet.
 
The scheme, designed by Collardo Collins, will see 244 apartments and houses being built, as well as 16,000 sq ft of business premises and 204 parking spaces.
 
At the same time, the project will retain the facade of the building and its iconic chimney.
 
Sculpture Real Estate will manage the project's delivery. Its director Jonathan Meier said: "The history of the site and the city will come through in the quality of the finished product and will further regenerate this area of Bath."
 
Head of UK Residential at Aberdeen Ed Crockett commented: "The Bath Press site provides us with an excellent opportunity to deliver a scheme of scale and quality in the under supplied and highly sought after central Bath residential market."
 
The project will bring back into use a building that has been empty for ten years, but, because of the retention of its historic frontage, will keep the visual appearance of Georgian-style blonde sandstone construction that typifies the city.
 
Indeed, the latter consideration is often an issue firms must take into account when constructing new buildings or, as in this case, re-using older ones. The heart of Bath is a Unesco World Heritage Site due to its mixture of Roman ruins and neoclassic Palladian buildings dating from its 18th century status as a spa town.
 
While World Heritage Status does not add new restrictions to the way the built environment can change - this will still depend on the listed status of buildings - Unesco has placed a number of its sites on a danger list where it believes new developments will detract from the heritage. It has listed the mercantile port city of Liverpool in this category, due to plans for a range of large new residential and commercial buildings in the vicinity.

Image: Image credit: iStock/chrisdorney

 

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