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£1m training scheme aims to boost skills in construction

£1m training scheme aims to boost skills in construction

As demand for new homes continues to rise and the construction industry prepares for further growth in output, a training scheme has been launched to boost skills among workers in the sector whose jobs are not directly related to construction.The Home Builders Federation (HBF) and Construction Industry Training Board (CITB) have launched the £1 million initiative, which will offer skills enhancement programmes for people working in areas like sales, marketing and business development.Employees, graduate trainees and people on undergraduate placements will receive training to help ensure the construction sector can continue to meet certain standards with an expanding workforce, amid rising demand for housing.Money will also be made available to enable further training of sales and marketing professionals, as the industry focuses on improving customer service.Stewart Baseley, executive chairman of the HBF, pointed out that tens of thousands of new workers have been recruited into the housebuilding industry in the past two years and this trend is only set to accelerate as output continues to rise.He also stressed that property construction is an "extremely complex" process requiring a diverse range of people with varying skills."If we are to provide the high-quality homes and the level of customer service today's new-build customer demands we need to ensure every member of staff in every part of the process is trained to the best possible standard," said Mr Baseley."This scheme we are delighted to launch with CITB will enable HBF members to provide more of their employees with further training and development."Steve Radley, director of policy at CITB, said this pilot fund is a "first step" towards tackling the skills challenges facing the housebuilding sector.If the approach proves successful, it could be extended to other areas of the construction industry. 

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